For Later: January 2017

My For Later shelf is now more of a For Later library but somehow the Just Ordered list comes out and every week the shelves just grow. These titles sneaked on recently: Thug Kitchen (subtitle could cause offence). Gwyneth Paltrow loved it. Not sure if that's a recommendation but I'm all for a bit of cursing…
View More about For Later: January 2017

On espionage

Recently I listened to a free lecture on The Great Courses app (available for iOS or Android) called "Becoming a Spy". I found this intriguing (no pun intended) and really interesting to hear the reasons why an individual decides to betray their country and become an agent of espionage. Several reasons were given, for example ideology, money, a…
View More about On espionage

Tell you what #AotearoaReads

I confess I didn't read all of the books in my eyewateringly large pile of holiday reads. But I accidentally went all #AotearoaReads and it was ACE. First up, I finished Can you tolerate this? Personal essays by Ashleigh Young. She tells stories about her family and relationships, but also little histories that have captured…
View More about Tell you what #AotearoaReads

The Beano Annual 2017

Did you read comics when you were young? I'm English and grew up on this one. If you enjoyed The Beano in your younger years, or are young now, you'll get a laugh out of this annual. Many of the classic characters are still there - such as Dennis the Menace (and his dog Gnasher)…
View More about The Beano Annual 2017

Who Likes What

A favourite end of year time-waster is looking at Best of lists compiled by writers I admire. If books appear on more than one list they must be really good. Surely. Does the opinion of a Man Booker Prize winner count for more than a non-winner? Yes if it's Anne Enright and the book is…
View More about Who Likes What

Salman Rushdie: Storytelling as Scheherazade

I love reading Salman Rushdie. He weaves the most colourful and beautiful stories, with a little magic shining through like gold threads. Transporting the reader to different cultures, countries and times, his stories often address current issues through the medium of fantasy. Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights Two Years Eight Months & Twenty Eight Nights…
View More about Salman Rushdie: Storytelling as Scheherazade