A fond farewell

Due to changing circumstances this will be my last blog for Christchurch City Libraries. I've had a whole lot of fun writing about all sorts of interesting things. In total I've written 56 blogs for the library (including this one) and three for our professional development Bibliofile site. I'm going to look back briefly at my 10 favourite blogs, in no particular order.

My first blog all the way in 2013 looked back at the life of the author Deric Longden.

The centenary of the First World War has played a big part in my blogging, being a major interest of mine. Amongst other things I had the opportunity to interview author Peter Hart about 1914 and look at some connections between aviation, Antarctica and the war.

I've looked at some of my favourite eResources, such as the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography - a great rabbit hole to get lost down.

Reporting on local events has been fun. I went to see the All Blacks' World Cup victory parade in 2015 - it was great to be able to do that and enjoy the spectacle but also to write about it too. 

I've had the chance to report back on library events I've attended, including a wonderful, thought-provoking workshop run by Te Reo Wainene o Tua about the power of storytelling.

The Christchurch WORD Festival also afforded plenty of blogging opportunities, and chances to hear from awesome authors. Here's me getting super excited about the prospect of seeing Stella Duffy. WORD has also given me the opportunity to wax lyrical about some favourite fictional characters such as Devon Santos from Into the River.

I've also written about poo, cos that's always fun. Which kind of segued into my penultimate blog, about a dodgy district health officer and a jujitsu fighting suffragette.

You can find most of my back catalogue here on the website.

Ka kite readers!

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