5 articles on… COVID-19 Vaccines

New Zealand's COVID-19 vaccination rollout is gaining momentum, and at the same time there seems to be even more anti-vaccination material being spread. So when I received a slip in my mailbox telling me to go to Reddit to get my vaccine information, as an information professional I was appalled. I thought it was time to conduct my own research using some reliable resources.

What do I think is a reliable resource? Firstly I look for information from credible sources. The library is a great starting place because we have access to scholarly research databases which have articles and reports written by experts and many are peer reviewed. What is peer review? Peer review is quality control - an article that is published on a subject is then reviewed by a panel of experts in that subject area (generally considered as the author's professional peers...hence the term "peer review".) Scholarly articles can be tricky for the lay person to understand so I have picked out some articles that are aimed at the general public (not scholarly but still reliable).

I have spent some time researching the COVID-19 vaccines and here are some articles that I have found - you can read them yourself or do your own research. If you want a good starting place for your research try our eResources Discovery search. Research and studies on COVID-19 vaccines are ongoing so you may wish to follow up you research on a regular basis. 

In New Zealand the vaccine that is currently (at the time of writing) being administered is the Pfizer/BioNTech mRNA vaccine. The New Zealand Government has agreements with four COVID-19 vaccine suppliers.

  1. You and your vaccine
    New Scientist Australian Edition 14 August 2021 no3347
    Database OverDrive or Libby
    A overview of the all the vaccines that are fighting COVID-19 in the world. For each vaccine it looks at how it works, its efficacy and the side effects. This is written for the lay person - a perfect starting point.
  2. Life, New Improved.
    Rowan Jacobsen. Scientific American July 2021 volu325 issue 1
    Database: Science Reference Center - article found via search on eResources Discovery Search (eDS)
    The article discusses about the development of artificial proteins for COVID-19 vaccine and revolutionizing biology. Topics of discussion includes the research conducted by Lexis Walls at the University of Washington, for developing proteins that were not derived from components found in nature but consists of artificial microscopic proteins drawn up on a computer, and their creation marked the beginning of an extraordinary ability to treat diseases.
  3. COVID-19 vaccine rumors and conspiracy theories: The need for cognitive inoculation against misinformation to improve vaccine adherence
    Md Saiful Islam, Abu-Hena Mostofa Kamal, et al. PLoS One vol. 15 no.5 pp1-17
    Database: Academic Search Elite searched through eDS
    There are many rumours and conspiracy theories around COVID-19 vaccines. This article reports on a study monitoring COVID-19 information online to find out how much of the information circulating is true or misinformation.
  4. Evaluation of the safety profile of COVID-19 vaccines: a rapid review
    Qianhui Wu, et al. BMC Medicine, 17417015, 7/28/2021, Vol. 19, Issue 1
    Database: Academic Search Elite searched through eDS
    The quick development of of COVID-19 vaccines has aroused public concern over the safety of vaccines - this review looks at all the safety information and data provided by clinical trials and reactions from those who have received their vaccinations.
  5. The dangers of vaccine nationalism
    Marçal Sanmartí New Zealand International Review, 01/03/2021, Vol. 46 Issue 2, p2-4, 3p
    Database: Australia/New Zealand Reference Centre Plus searched through eDS
    A discussion about wealthy countries hoarding COVID-19 vaccine. The World Health Organisation and the United Nations have warned that this is a serious threat and morally wrong and completely useless to defeat the virus.

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